Friday Question: What should be done about black youth and education?

Black youth are not getting a quality education in many of the major centers of black life in this country (NYC, ATL, DC, Baltimore, Cleveland, St. Louis, Chicago, etc.) Not to mention all across the south. Nationally, the graduation rate is 53 percent; in contrast, the graduation rate of what schools call “underrepresented minorities” – blacks, Latinos and American Indians – is 45 percent. In California alone, 41.3 percent African-American students drop out of high school.

If these children are not prepared to graduate from high school and don’t attend college or get some form of higher education…what will be their prospects for the future? Will they end up with low paying jobs, find crime as a way to support themselves, or just fade into the new face of U.S. poverty. A recent study on the bulging prison system noted, “One in 100 Americans is behind bars in 2008, about 2.4 million people currently are incarcerated and nearly 60 percent of young black males who dropped out of high school have served time in jail

What will happen to the young people who do not receive a REAL “education” from America’s public school system?

2 Comments

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2 Responses to Friday Question: What should be done about black youth and education?

  1. Chris B

    If we turn this country around and I believe Obama and his cabinet will do that, we’ll create jobs rebuilding the infrastructure and developing alternate energy sources instead of spending trillions of dollars to “secure” middle eastern oil. We can train people to build these infrastructures and hire people at a living wage and pay people a living wage. Won’t be rich but it would be nice to have a real job! I’m not young but I sure hope we can get to this for those of you younger than I. There used to be a middle class here…now there’s IT jobs getting more scarce and outsourced and sh*t. Some people need to move around and I’m like that. I can surely see why some people want to move bags when there’s nothing else going on and no other way. Most young people to to move around and use their strength. Brings these jobs back.
    The college educated can develop the alternate energy sources. My dad worked for the WPA and half my town was built by the WPA. College is great but it alone is not what built this country. We need everybody. Someday this will be realized.

  2. Lynne Edwards

    More than ten years ago I saw John Singleton testify before congress about the state of America’s public schools. He suggested that we should close schools until a select group of educators could reorganize our curriculums to meet the needs of current students and challenge them. As a third generation educator and a parent of an educator, I often wonder why Mr. Singletons’ many suggestions during his testimony were never even considered for our current underfunded, understaffed and poorly administered ( on the federal level) system of education. We are still using a curriculum that teaches skills most children have mastered by the time they enter Headstart. Parents are more educated and along our technologically advanced society children are more exposed and more stimulated and just know more than my son- who has been teaching for two years- did when he entered kindergarden. He knew much more than I did at that age and research proves our children are really able to learn more faster. Mr. Singleton was correct in his testimony to place the blame upon us who have the power to change our system but not the care to do so – with a quickness!

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