You Can Check “Negro” on This Year’s Census. Yippee!

NPR is reporting that the US Census has slipped up and put “Negro” on the 2010 form.  You guys know that I have a special place in my heart for this word (see the title of this blog).  They claim they added it because some older African-Americans wrote it on the form in previous years.  Really?  I need to call Mother Dear and tell her not to do that.  It’s 2010.  I wonder if they actually considered adding in “colored” as well.

Census Bureau, do you really have to think about these things?  Really!?!?  DC is a few min away from their Suitland MD offices.  I might need to send a letter or something.

I’m not surprised.  I think someone may have been lashing out in a form of anti-Obama style protest.  It reminds me of when that artist put a penis in the art work of the Little Mermaid VHS cover.  Here’s the sccop from NPR.Org

http://2010.census.gov/2010census/how/interactive-form.php

Photo: From the 2010 questionaire. (Census.gov)

By Mark Memmott, NPR.org

The Census Bureau says it has included “Negro” as a way for individuals to classify their race in the 2010 Census because some older African-Americans wrote it on their forms in 2000.

But many African-Americans find it insulting.

– “It’s almost like a slap in the face,” Nikyle Fitzgerald tells WTOL in Toledo.

– “I am a little offended,” Dawud Ingram says to WCBS-TV.

– “It’s a bad vibe word,” Kevin Bishop says in the New York Daily News.

We’ve asked Census for some historical background on when the word has been used in the past. We’ll update with that information.

4 Comments

Filed under african american, black, black men, black women, culture, government, negro, news, opinion, why

4 Responses to You Can Check “Negro” on This Year’s Census. Yippee!

  1. ANJI!

    I actually don’t have a problem with the word Negro. If you look at the REAL meaning and the root, its not a bad term. What I do have a issue with is the word black. Look up that definition: soiled, evil, impure, unclean, dirty, bad, ugly, dismal, stained with dirt, sullen or ill, threatening, disgrace, gloomy. Now tell me why THAT is a word used to characterize people of color?

  2. lilkunta

    Ia it really an accident? So much of this stuff is happening now that there is an AfrAm POTUS.

    A shame it is. So disrespectful it is.
    There are no proofreaders?

  3. charles

    In agreement with Anji, Negro is the more accurate description of our race, for the reasons she(?) mentioned. Most people who prefer “African-American” to identify Negros are unaware that there also are Caucasian African-Americans.

  4. Mara

    Recently, I found the 2010 Census form hanging on my door. As I began filling it out, I came across a dilemma. The U.S. government wants to know if my children are adopted or not and it wants to know what our races are. Being adopted myself, I had to put “Other” and “Don’t Know Adopted” for my race and “Other” and “Don’t Know” for my kids’ races.

    Can you imagine not knowing your ethnicity, your race? Now imagine walking into a vital records office and asking the clerk for your original birth certificate only to be told “No, you can’t have it, it’s sealed.”

    How about being presented with a “family history form” to fill out at every single doctor’s office visit and having to put “N/A Adopted” where life saving information should be?

    Imagine being asked what your nationality is and having to respond with “I don’t know”.

    It is time that the archaic practice of sealing and altering birth certificates of adopted persons stops.

    Adoption is a 5 billion dollar, unregulated industry that profits from the sale and redistribution of children. It turns children into chattel who are re-labeled and sold as “blank slates”.

    Genealogy, a modern-day fascination, cannot be enjoyed by adopted persons with sealed identities. Family trees are exclusive to the non-adopted persons in our society.

    If adoption is truly to return to what is best for a child, then the rights of children to their biological identities should NEVER be violated. Every single judge that finalizes an adoption and orders a child’s birth certificate to be sealed should be ashamed of him/herself.

    I challenge all readers: Ask the adopted persons that you know if their original birth certificates are sealed.

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