Category Archives: beauty

So, We’re All Ugly Just Because Some People Aren’t Into Black Chicks?

Personal Opinion is not fact.  Asking men about their preferences when it comes to women and attaching some pseudoscience to it doesn’t make your research air tight.  I need someone to explain the concept of opinion polls to the blogger over at Psychology Today who had the audacity to try to pass his bias off as science.  The title of the blog post I’m talking about is “Why Are Black Women Less Physically Attractive Than Other Women? Why black women, but not black men?”. Psychology Today has since taken the post down, but you can read it here.  You can read more about this here as well.

Here’s an excerpt:

What accounts for the markedly lower average level of physical attractiveness among black women? Black women are on average much heavier than nonblack women. The mean body-mass index (BMI) at Wave III is 28.5 among black women and 26.1 among nonblack women. (Black and nonblack men do not differ in BMI: 27.0 vs. 26.9.) However, this is not the reason black women are less physically attractive than nonblack women. Black women have lower average level of physical attractiveness net of BMI. Nor can the race difference in intelligence (and the positive association between intelligence and physical attractiveness) account for the race difference in physical attractiveness among women. Black women are still less physically attractive than nonblack women net of BMI and intelligence. Net of intelligence, black men are significantly more physically attractive than nonblack men.

There are many biological and genetic differences between the races. However, such race differences usually exist in equal measure for both men and women. For example, because they have existed much longer in human evolutionary history, Africans have more mutations in their genomes than other races. And the mutation loads significantly decrease physical attractiveness (because physical attractiveness is a measure of genetic and developmental health). But since both black women and black men have higher mutation loads, it cannot explain why only black women are less physically attractive, while black men are, if anything, more attractive.

The only thing I can think of that might potentially explain the lower average level of physical attractiveness among black women is testosterone. Africans on average have higher levels of testosterone than other races, and testosterone, being an androgen (male hormone), affects the physical attractiveness of men and women differently. Men with higher levels of testosterone have more masculine features and are therefore more physically attractive. In contrast, women with higher levels of testosterone also have more masculine features and are therefore less physically attractive. The race differences in the level of testosterone can therefore potentially explain why black women are less physically attractive than women of other races, while (net of intelligence) black men are more physically attractive than men of other races.

Personally, I’m outraged about this.  Not surprised, but outraged.  Black women birth black babies and further the black race.  Thus, “they” must attack, berate, and abuse us in the media or otherwise.  Don’t believe me?  Google “Michelle Obama”.

There is also a long history of psychology research focusing on the suggested inferiority of Black people.  Has history taught us nothing?  It has taught us to know racist and eugenic talk from the psychological community a mile a way.

To the author:
You might as well use “negroid” or “ape-like” in your piece, Mr. Kanazawa.  “The only thing I can think of…”, you say??  That sounds like you are trying to pass off your opinions as fact.  Beauty has always been in the eye of the beholder.  Just say that you don’t find black women attractive and that your opinion is shared by some other men.  This is America and we have the right to voice or opinions.  We all know what color Barbie is and that the European standard of beauty is the STANDARD.  You as an Asian man know the struggles that Asian women go through trying to conform.  As a person of color, you should realize how people of color in America see themselves differently than how those outside of their race see them.

Black women are not less attractive, as your title states.  Opinion is just opinion.  Men just like what they like.  As an old song said, “If you don’t like it, don’t knock it.   Somebody else might wanna rock it.”

Questions

  • What is “AddHealth”?
  • Who paid for this study?

13 Comments

Filed under african american, beauty, black women, culture, love, opinion, race, racism, relationships, sex, society, white folks, women

Overweight Women Charged Extra at Georgia Nail Salon

Sisters spend a LOT of money at nail salons. I’m not into all the designs, gel nails, silk wraps, and what have you, but I know a ton of women who are. I was amazed that a nail salon would tack on an extra $5 for what…FAT. That’s right. An african-american woman in Georgia was recently told that the extra 5 dollars on her bill was due to her being overweight. Apparently, the nail salon had experienced some broken chairs due it it’s heftier customers.

I have a question. Do they have a scale at the front of the store where they can weigh you before you get your services and determine whether you qualify for the broken chair fee? What do you think? Would you patronize a place that charged overweight customers more? We do in the case of the airlines.

Michelle Fonville said her experience at Natural Nails on Covington Highway in DeKalb County turned from pleasant to painful in a matter of moments. “I was humiliated. I almost cried. Tears were forming in my eyes,” said Fonville. She said things went downhill on Monday after the salon manager gave her the bill for her manicure, pedicure and eyebrow arch.
Fonville realized that she had been overcharged by $5. “I said, ‘I’ve been overcharged. She may have made an error,’” said Fonville. “She broke it down, then told me she charged me $5 more because I was overweight.”
Fonville said she couldn’t believe what was happening and recounted the experience with Channel 2 Action News reporter Eric Philips. “I said, Ma’am, you can’t charge me $5 more. That’s discrimination because of my weight,” said Fonville.

Click here to see the video and read the rest of this story.

5 Comments

Filed under african american, beauty, black women, business, drama, news, opinion, women

Sex and the City 2: Black Don’t Crack

Black actresses need to thank God that “Black Don’t Crack”.  Apparently HD brings out every little flaw.

I saw “Sex and the City 2” Thursday and I’m telling you, HD film is NOT forgiving!  Not at all.  All of the ladies looked much older than in the first film.  Even Charlotte, who was so youthful looking, was showing major signs of aging (most notably in the chin area).  SJP has always shown her age and is not a Botox or surgery girl so I wasn’t surprised at how she looks.  I will say, Samantha looked the best out of all 4.

I really would have expected that they’d found some way to filter out the harshness of HD.  Whoo!  Makeup Artists, you have your work cut out for you.  Sistafriend actresses, ladies let’s hope that the Melanin and some good moisturizers helps your black not to crack.

19 Comments

Filed under african american, beauty, celebrity, culture, hollywood, opinion, race, women

Butt Naked Wednesdays: Erykah Badu’s Advice to Women in the Music Industry – Video

“Butt neked with glitter on ya wit a beeper….Butt Neked Wednesdays”
“Do some hoe shit”

I know she’s being funny in this video, but in light of her recent video, Window Seat, I’m sure people are calling it irony and foreshadowing.  I still love her boldness and respect the message she is trying to give in “Window Seat”.  We all know what’s really going on in the music industry when it comes to the images of black women.

BTW: This clip is from a great documentary called “Before the Music Dies“.  If you love real music, it’s a must see.

3 Comments

Filed under african american, art, beauty, black, black women, celebrity, media, music, sex, video, women

Erykah Badu: We love your nakedness

I was really, really shocked at the negative response that many Black people have had to Erykah Badu’s “Window Seat” video.  Outside of the fact that filming was done without a proper permit (which could bring some legal heat from the City of Dallas), I really didn’t understand the drama.   Then I remembered that she’s a black woman.

  • She is a black woman who has not allowed her image to be over-sexualized in the media.
  • She is not Trina or Lil Kim.  She’s not a video vixen
  • She is a “natural sista” and “earth mother goddess” whom many have put on a royal pedestal to be held up as an example of truth and light
  • She’s done something shocking and many are not comfortable with it.

How dare she make you uncomfortable?  How dare she try to do something different and strange?  How dare she be so “out of the box.”  Right?

This is all about the boxes that Badu is metaphorically evolving from in the video.  The boxes that say in the Black community only video hoes, strippers, female rappers and the like can take their clothes off in public.  It’s ok for them right?  The boxes that are at work right now telling us that we should not THINK that this video is ok.  We should think what THEY say we should think, right?

Of course, sisters with wisdom and truth, who wear their hair without chemical straighteners and understand mathematics would never expose themselves to make a point, right?

If you agree with that, I’m sure you’d  agree that Black people don’t do performance art anyway?  We can’t possibly understand all of the symbolism in the video because we are so caught up in the “groupthink”.  The same groupthink that says Waka Flocka Flame and Soulja Boy make good music.  Isn’t that right?

So let’s all just take this video at face value and join in the chorus of people who don’t get it and can’t accept it.  Let’s stay on the surface and not dig deeper.  Let’s assassinate the character of the beautiful black sister who is trying to speak to us from a place of vulnerability in her art.  Let’s do to her what she’s already symbolically done to herself…strip down her motives and assassinate her character.

“As soon as the thought came to my mind, I decided to assassinate myself as a gesture. Because it was going to happen anyway. The video is a prediction of what is happening now. […] I would like to say that it was a protest to awaken a term called ‘groupthink.’ It’s a term that was coined in 1952. It’s the recognition of a state of being for humans. It’s human nature for a person to be afraid to express his or her self in fear of being ostracized by the group or general consensus,” the singer explains.  – source

I don’t know about y’all, but I’d rather see a video like this, something risky and artistic, than 90% of what I usually see in the media.  I’d much rather see nakedness with a point than random booty shaking and bikinis.

Erykah Badu, I love your nakedness, your vulnerability, and your strength.  I hope you sell lots of downloads and CDs.

11 Comments

Filed under african american, art, beauty, black, black women, booty, celebrity, news, opinion, race, sex, video, women, youtube

Black Barbies Cost Less Than White Barbies at LA Walmart

Black Barbie Doll = $3.00.  White Barbie Doll = $5.93.  Why am I’m not surprised.  Oh Walmart…you know better than this.  Thanks to the folks at FunkyJunk.com for posting out this Walmart Fail.  Guanabee.com: “It was uploaded by a woman from Louisiana who says she took it at her local Wal-Mart.”  Kids, even your toys know it’s not a post-racial America.  If that’s not subliminal…

Leave a Comment

Filed under african american, beauty, black, black women, children, culture, news, opinion, race, youth

Is Gabourey Sidibe Attractive or Are People Being Nice?

Most people would never call a person ugly or fat to their face unless they wanted to hurt the other person’s feelings.  Howard Stern is not one of those people.  He’s make a living saying whatever he wants about whom ever he wants.  He recently made some comments about “Precious” star, Gabourey Sidibe.

Stern drew criticism from the mainstream media for his comments about Gabourey Sidibe’s appearance at the Academy Awards. Howard Stern said: “There’s the most enormous, fat black chick I’ve ever seen. Everyone’s pretending she’s a part of show business and she’s never going to be in another movie.”

Howard Stern played clips of reporters from mainstream media outlets fuming over his frank statements about Gabourey Sidibe’s weight on Wednesday, and then responded by saying: “Obesity in this country is out of control….What’s really sad though is that there are people who say it’s okay to be this heavy. You’ve got to love your body, you’ve got to embrace it.” – Washington Examiner

What do you think readers? We all know that sometimes things are said because they are nice, but they are not realistic.  Let’s face it, people lie.   Is it realistic to think that in a society that is obsessed with physical beauty and perfection that a person of Gabourey’s size will have a vibrant film career?  If she was not a famous actress, would people call her beautiful? If we acknowledge the skin color politics of the black community, how does that figure into this conversation?  I want you guys to think about this honestly. If this were your child, what perspective would you give her about what people may be saying in her face and what they might be saying behind her back?

(Note: She recently landed a role on Showtime’s “Big C” playing a “smart-mouthed student“.  Um…don’t large black women have a history of playing smart mouthed maids, friends, students, etc.  Typecast!)

25 Comments

Filed under african american, beauty, black women, celebrity, hollywood, media, news, opinion, women

“Is Oprah Winfrey Medium Complexioned?” and Sammy Sosa

Someone googled “is oprah winfrey medium complexioned” six times and some how ended up on this blog.  Um…I don’t get it.  Somebody fill me in, is there some kind of controversy over Oprah’s skin color that I haven’t heard about?  Did she describe herself as medium complexed?  God forbid she say that she’s dark skinned, huh?  SMH, skin color is still a very polarizing concept…well, maybe it’s better said that it’s a polarizing reality in the Black community (Indian community, Latino community, West Indian community, etc).

I’m sure this is just a random occurance, but as an African American woman, I would not be surprised about a color controversy.  Look at the Sammy Sosa situation.  Clearly the man has used some sort of skin lightening treatment.  When you look at an older picture of his previously chocolate brown skin…why would you even have to wonder? I believe the claim that Sosa’s lightened skin in this photo is the result of a skin rejuvenation process and the bright TV lights at the awards show he was attending with his wife.

According to Sosa, who addressed the skin controversy with ESPNDeportes.com’s Enrique Rojas, he is using a cream that “whitens” his skin. Mostly, Sosa said, it’s a skin softener.

Sosa is from the Dominican Republic.  I’ve seen it noted several times that many Dominican women (and many people around the Caribbean, South America, Africa, and yes, here in the US) Dominican women straighten their hair, which some experts say is a direct result of a historical learned rejection of all things black.  This rejection, seen in many diasporan cultures, has also manifested in the use of skin lightening creams.

Fair-Skin Fashion Boosts Sales of Whitening Creams in India

Sosa is symptomatic of global self-hatred

Indian men hope skin cream will change their status, fortune

Skin-lightening creams face FDA ban: Dermatologists defend treatment…

Cream labelled ‘racism in a bottle’

The Skin Bleaching Phenomenon – Commentary

This is not an isolated incident of self hate.  Sosa is just dark skinned person dealing with issues of self hate that are rooted in the concept that the closer your skin tone is to white, the more beautiful/handsome you are.  He’s just assimilating to the value system he’s been taught to respect.  That racist system of thought devalues dark skin, period.  It is not celebrated.  It is not desirable.  Therefore, I say the correct response is education and understanding, not ridicule.

15 Comments

Filed under africa, assimulation, beauty, black, black man, caribbean, celebrity, culture, hate, news, opinion, race, racism

What do you think about Chris Rock’s “Good Hair”?

Hi all,

I was so proud to strut out of the theatre rocking my long, natural locs after seeing Chris Rock’s “Good Hair”.  No perm over here, homey!

I’ve seen some reviews from sistas on blogs and all over the net… all largely positive.  I was enlightened by the information on how the chemicals in relaxer really work (that chicken example cured me from ever wanting the “creamy crack on my head AGAIN!!!) and the info on where weave really comes from.  It made me wonder if some of the women I know (who are very picky and won’t even eat the potato salad at a picnic if they don’t know who made it) will be weary of wearing hair that might have had “bugs” in it.

Things I loved about it:

  • Derek J – A tiny man in tall heels
  • The scene where the white guy gets botox.  Hilarious!
  • The reactions to Chris selling black hair – I wonder if someone is going to have some angry customers at their weave shop after that??
  • The fact that they didn’t show the hair being washed and chemical treated in India – Um…did they wash and treat it?  I mean he showed Dudley Product’s whole set up…just wondering.
  • Black men talking about how they can’t touch their woman’s hair.
  • Exposing how bad relaxer really is for the skin and hair.
  • Raven Simone – That is a REAL chick, right there!  Someone who you could just hang out with.  I love her!
  • Nia Long needs her own TV show.  She is so funny and real.  Loved her comments.
  • It’s a shame how early some little girls are taught that their hair is “bad”.
  • Where are women getting thousands of dollars to spend on weave?!?!  I never knew it cost so much for good quality “fake” natural hair.

Like many of the reviewers who’ve commented on the movie, I thought there was a lot of information missing regarding the source of self hatred when it comes to beauty in the black community and assimilation to euro standards (Sharpton did break it down, though.  Nicely!).   However, the movie is a winner without that information.  Rock is a commedian, not an activist.  I loved the movie and encourage others to see it.

Did you see the movie?  What are your thoughts on “Good Hair”?

Update: One of my black young female co-workers and a white older female co-worker were talking about the movie a few mins ago.  The younger one said “My boyfriend told me yesterday, “You’re wearing those people’s oppression on your head!”, referring to her weave.  Toooo Funny!  Although, he does kinda have a point.

9 Comments

Filed under african american, beauty, black, black man, celebrity, culture, funny, opinion, race, women

Awesome Love Song for The Obamas

 

This just about made me cry. Enjoy and tell us what you think!

4 Comments

Filed under beauty, black man, black men, black women, dancing, family, love, music, obama, relationships, video, youtube