Category Archives: celebrity

Sex and the City 2: Black Don’t Crack

Black actresses need to thank God that “Black Don’t Crack”.  Apparently HD brings out every little flaw.

I saw “Sex and the City 2” Thursday and I’m telling you, HD film is NOT forgiving!  Not at all.  All of the ladies looked much older than in the first film.  Even Charlotte, who was so youthful looking, was showing major signs of aging (most notably in the chin area).  SJP has always shown her age and is not a Botox or surgery girl so I wasn’t surprised at how she looks.  I will say, Samantha looked the best out of all 4.

I really would have expected that they’d found some way to filter out the harshness of HD.  Whoo!  Makeup Artists, you have your work cut out for you.  Sistafriend actresses, ladies let’s hope that the Melanin and some good moisturizers helps your black not to crack.

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Is it just me or is Sunday Best a lil different this season?

I watched “Sunday Best” on BET last night.  I have to say, the tone of the show is much more “holy roller-ish” than last year when DC’s own Y’Anna Crawley won.  I must say off top, I’m calling Leandria Johnson for the win this season.  The girl is Legendary.  Her singing is effortless and she’s humble about it.  That’s a combination for gospel greatness.

Any who…

Last year the girls from Mary Mary and BeBe Winans were giving the singers real industry critique.  They did not shy away from telling people that they sounded bad.  They didn’t sugar coat or give a “That’s ok.  Sing baby!” pity observation.  They told the truth.  As a singer (yes, yall.  I sing.) I appreciated the honesty.  The last thing you want to do is tell someone they can sing and put them out in public to be humiliated.  (…like they do on American Idol.  From what I understand, those people go through a number of tryouts before they get to the real judges.  Why would they think they have a chance in front of the cameras?  Perhaps because no one has told them the truth and they’ve moved on to the next round in the audition process.)

Well, this season the judging is much more toned down.  Donnie McClurkin, Yolanda Adams, Tina Campbell, and Kim Burrell are some of the best singers in gospel.  They know singing, but they are not coming with fierce critiques this season.  There is a whole lot of classic African American church dialect, phrases, and praises being tossed around.  I think the old rule of “If you have nothing good to say, don’t say anything at all.” is in full effect.  As I watched last night I really wished that the advice and direction that was given last year, given in love, was there as well as the admonishment and praises.  I really that judges are sharing the harsh realities of the music industry with these singers behind the scenes.

They must have gotten some letters from the saints saying that they weren’t being nice.  Perhaps people felt that since it’s a gospel show is should be more about the spirit of God and giving praises than singing ability and performance on stage.  What do you think?

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Tiger Wood’s Kindergarten Teacher Exposes Childhood Lie

In 2005, Tiger Woods told a shocking and moving story of being victimized as a child because of his race. In an interview for a book written by Charles Barkley and in an interview with Barbara Walters, Woods said he was abused by a group of kids on his first day of kindergarten because of his skin color.  Kids are cruel sometimes, but the story is outrageous.

“I became aware of my racial identity on my first day of school, on my first day of kindergarten,” Woods said in the interview. “A group of sixth graders tied me to a tree, spray-painted the word ‘n****r’ on me, and threw rocks at me. That was my first day of school. And the teacher really didn’t do much of anything.”

Well apparently, his kindergarten teacher doesn’t agree with his version of his first day of school, according to TMZ.com. Ms. Maureen Decker doesn’t remember the incident and this story has brought out the former principal at the time as well.  He says the same.

Why is this coming out now (Apparently Decker aired her opinion about the story in the media previously)?  Because the media needs as many women as possible to come out of the woodwork with drama and lies that relate to Tiger during this slow news cycle.  Drama sells.  If I see this mess on CNN masquerading as real news, I’ll be mad.

There are tons of examples of school yard racism that really happen and scar kids for life.  He’s an ass if he made this up for sympathy.

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Butt Naked Wednesdays: Erykah Badu’s Advice to Women in the Music Industry – Video

“Butt neked with glitter on ya wit a beeper….Butt Neked Wednesdays”
“Do some hoe shit”

I know she’s being funny in this video, but in light of her recent video, Window Seat, I’m sure people are calling it irony and foreshadowing.  I still love her boldness and respect the message she is trying to give in “Window Seat”.  We all know what’s really going on in the music industry when it comes to the images of black women.

BTW: This clip is from a great documentary called “Before the Music Dies“.  If you love real music, it’s a must see.

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Erykah Badu: We love your nakedness

I was really, really shocked at the negative response that many Black people have had to Erykah Badu’s “Window Seat” video.  Outside of the fact that filming was done without a proper permit (which could bring some legal heat from the City of Dallas), I really didn’t understand the drama.   Then I remembered that she’s a black woman.

  • She is a black woman who has not allowed her image to be over-sexualized in the media.
  • She is not Trina or Lil Kim.  She’s not a video vixen
  • She is a “natural sista” and “earth mother goddess” whom many have put on a royal pedestal to be held up as an example of truth and light
  • She’s done something shocking and many are not comfortable with it.

How dare she make you uncomfortable?  How dare she try to do something different and strange?  How dare she be so “out of the box.”  Right?

This is all about the boxes that Badu is metaphorically evolving from in the video.  The boxes that say in the Black community only video hoes, strippers, female rappers and the like can take their clothes off in public.  It’s ok for them right?  The boxes that are at work right now telling us that we should not THINK that this video is ok.  We should think what THEY say we should think, right?

Of course, sisters with wisdom and truth, who wear their hair without chemical straighteners and understand mathematics would never expose themselves to make a point, right?

If you agree with that, I’m sure you’d  agree that Black people don’t do performance art anyway?  We can’t possibly understand all of the symbolism in the video because we are so caught up in the “groupthink”.  The same groupthink that says Waka Flocka Flame and Soulja Boy make good music.  Isn’t that right?

So let’s all just take this video at face value and join in the chorus of people who don’t get it and can’t accept it.  Let’s stay on the surface and not dig deeper.  Let’s assassinate the character of the beautiful black sister who is trying to speak to us from a place of vulnerability in her art.  Let’s do to her what she’s already symbolically done to herself…strip down her motives and assassinate her character.

“As soon as the thought came to my mind, I decided to assassinate myself as a gesture. Because it was going to happen anyway. The video is a prediction of what is happening now. […] I would like to say that it was a protest to awaken a term called ‘groupthink.’ It’s a term that was coined in 1952. It’s the recognition of a state of being for humans. It’s human nature for a person to be afraid to express his or her self in fear of being ostracized by the group or general consensus,” the singer explains.  – source

I don’t know about y’all, but I’d rather see a video like this, something risky and artistic, than 90% of what I usually see in the media.  I’d much rather see nakedness with a point than random booty shaking and bikinis.

Erykah Badu, I love your nakedness, your vulnerability, and your strength.  I hope you sell lots of downloads and CDs.

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ABC News: Why Can’t a Successful Black Woman Find a Man?

I’m wishing Steve Harvey, Sherri Shepard, Jacque Reid, Hill Harper, and Jimi Izrael Good Luck as they try to answer this age old question:  Why Can’t a Successful Black Woman Find a Man?  I’m sure the panel will try their hardest, but the answer is as elusive as some have found the search for their man to be.  I’ll surely live blog this one, so look out for that.  All my Georgia ladies and gents, the event is happening in your neck of the woods so let me know if you get a ticket so I can hear the unedited scoop.

STEVE HARVEY AND “NIGHTLINE’S” VICKI MABREY TO CO-MODERATE LIVE DEBATE AT THE PORTER SANFORD PERFORMING ARTS CENTER IN DECATUR, GA

FRIDAY, APRIL 9th AT 7:00PM ET

In the United States, black college educated women outnumber black college educated men 2 to 1. Considering all the other factors that could lend to this disproportion, it’s not surprising people wonder why many successful black women cannot find a man.  ABC News “Nightline” asks this question and relevant others–Are black women’s expectations too high? Who’s to blame, Black women or black men? – in the next “Nightline Face Off” in Decatur, Georgia on Friday, April 9.

In this “Face-Off,” the 7th in the program’s series, Sherri Shepherd, Emmy award-winning co-host of ABC’s “The View” and Jacque Reid, star of VH1’s “Let’s Talk About Pep” will debate Hill Harper, CSI star and author of The Conversation, and Jimi Izrael, author of The Denzel Principle. Steve Harvey, radio talk show host and bestselling author of Act Like a Lady, Think Like a Man and “Nightline’s” Vicki Mabrey will co-moderate the debate.  Shepherd and Reid will participate as single, successful African American females who have difficulty finding an equal match while Harper and Izrael argue that single women should look beyond stereotypes when choosing a black man. Continue reading

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Chris Brown Cries Out For Help

Did Chris Brown appeal to his fans to prey for him?  No.  Did he put a call out saying that he’s working with a domestic violence organization and he wants people to support a new campaign against teen domestic violence?  NO.  Chris Brown has sent out an appeal to his fans to help him get radio air play.

Global Grind reports: Chris Brown has received a lot of flack since the incident withRihanna. Now Chris Brown is asking for the help of his fans to help him get back to the top of the charts. Chris Brown took to his SayNow page to plead for help from his friends. Chris Brown said:

“I ain’t never really did this but right now I need all of my fans help. A lot of radio stations aren’t playing my records. They are not being that supportive and I wouldn’t expect them to. It’s on the fans and what you guys do in your power to bring me back. That’s all I need is you guys and nothing else will do that except for the fans.”

Chris Brown continues on by saying he’s doing everything he needs to do but leaving it by saying:

“It’s on ya’ll. My singing and my music I do it for you guys and everything else but it won’t be possible if I’m not relevant on the radio and it wouldn’t be possible for me to be an artist if I don’t have the support.”

Chris Brown closes by saying he loves his fans.

  1. Chris, please ask your PR person to review your SayNow.com posts for consistency sake.  You don’t have to write like a Harvard grad, but you should use standard english.  I know that people want to sound authentically hood. I guess it’s about street cred.
  2. If you want people to stop hating on you, you need to be really, really apologetic.  Sure, you’ve apologized already.  Keep apologizing.
  3. To support someone is an endorsement of their personal brand.  A personal brand can be changed but it can’t be changed by the fans.

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Jules Kirby, It is never a good idea to admit that you say the n-word a lot on TV

Saw it for myself. New York Socialite Jules Kirby just said, “I use the N-word sometimes.” in the first episode of the CW’s “High Society”.  She also noted that she feels it should be ok to say.  This piece of footage aired right after another piece that showed her telling a friend that a black woman dancing in a club near them should move away.  Apparently the n-word clip ended up in one of the trailers and was posted to YouTube.  It has since been removed.  Hey, if you’re dad is a high powered lawyer I guess you got pull.  What you don’t have is any class.  I hope she doesn’t have a Twitter feed or blog cause I’m sure it’s been flooded.  Sad.  Doesn’t she know that comments like that are only for closed doors?  I mean, come on.  Take your blatant racism underground, right?

Huffington Post – “In one of the trailers, the first seen below, Kirby is seen saying, “I use the N-word sometimes.” That line is not taken out of context. In the first episode of the show she ALSO says she isn’t friends with many black, Jewish or gay people.

According to Monday’s Page Six, Kirby skipped last week’s launch party for the show.

“She’s particularly annoyed that she admits in the trailer to occasionally using the ‘N’ word, ” our source says. Kirby didn’t respond to a request for comment.”

Update: Why did CW pull the trailer?

“Because GLAAD complained. Because in it, sad NYC nightlife social climber Jules Kirby (more on her sad life here) admitted to using the “N-word” (not in the above clip), and Social Life editor Devorah Rose calls a party-goer a “tranny” (as seen in the above clip) after being told she “looks like a man” during this party.

With GLAAD (and the blogs!) on its back, The CW promised to yank the trailer; it’s already gone from YouTube, but taking it out of television circulation could take longer. (The show premires March 10.) Kirby, meanwhile, is in hiding, as people like she should be.” Source: here @ Queerty.com

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Is Gabourey Sidibe Attractive or Are People Being Nice?

Most people would never call a person ugly or fat to their face unless they wanted to hurt the other person’s feelings.  Howard Stern is not one of those people.  He’s make a living saying whatever he wants about whom ever he wants.  He recently made some comments about “Precious” star, Gabourey Sidibe.

Stern drew criticism from the mainstream media for his comments about Gabourey Sidibe’s appearance at the Academy Awards. Howard Stern said: “There’s the most enormous, fat black chick I’ve ever seen. Everyone’s pretending she’s a part of show business and she’s never going to be in another movie.”

Howard Stern played clips of reporters from mainstream media outlets fuming over his frank statements about Gabourey Sidibe’s weight on Wednesday, and then responded by saying: “Obesity in this country is out of control….What’s really sad though is that there are people who say it’s okay to be this heavy. You’ve got to love your body, you’ve got to embrace it.” – Washington Examiner

What do you think readers? We all know that sometimes things are said because they are nice, but they are not realistic.  Let’s face it, people lie.   Is it realistic to think that in a society that is obsessed with physical beauty and perfection that a person of Gabourey’s size will have a vibrant film career?  If she was not a famous actress, would people call her beautiful? If we acknowledge the skin color politics of the black community, how does that figure into this conversation?  I want you guys to think about this honestly. If this were your child, what perspective would you give her about what people may be saying in her face and what they might be saying behind her back?

(Note: She recently landed a role on Showtime’s “Big C” playing a “smart-mouthed student“.  Um…don’t large black women have a history of playing smart mouthed maids, friends, students, etc.  Typecast!)

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O.J. Simpson, Rodman, RuPaul: Black History Role Models?

LA Times – In a letter addressed to parents and community members, a South Los Angeles elementary school principal apologized Thursday for “questionable decisions” about which prominent African Americans to highlight in a parade marking the culmination of Black History Month.

Lorraine Abner’s letter did not name the individuals. But her apology came after three teachers at Wadsworth Avenue Elementary School were suspended while the Los Angeles Unified School District investigates allegations that they had their first-, second- and fourth-grade students carry pictures of O.J. Simpson, Dennis Rodman and RuPaul at last Friday’s event.

“Unfortunately, questionable decisions were made in the selection of noteworthy African American role models,” the letter said. “As the principal, I offer my apology for these errors in judgment.”

I don’t know about you, but for me Black History is Black History. If we remove one part of it, we are not telling the whole story. It is the whole story that makes history. We as African-Americans have had to fight to have our history included.   Now it would be a little hypocritical for us to start excluding people. To now start removing people or making apologies is unacceptable.

RuPaul represents a portion of our community.  We can’t celebrate our LGBTQ brothers and sisters?  There was a time in history before the trial and acquittal when O.J Simpson was a hero.  You remember those commercials.  Dennis Rodman was one hell of a basketball player. I think that Michael Jordan could give you a list of reasons why he should not be discarded.

I’d also like to note that the tale of O.J is not equal to the stories of Rodman and Rupaul.  Come on, people.  LA, I thought you guys were more progressive than this.  Oh no, I forgot…Prop 8.    Ok, but yall do like basketball so Rodman is ok, right.  Oh no, Yall only like the Lakers!  SMH

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