Category Archives: society

Racism I Found Today: Non-Black Version of “The Talk”

I’m late hearing about this terrible and blatantly racist article.  It’s written as a response to recent articles about “the talk” that black parents have with their kids, especially Black Boys, in light of the Trayvon Martin murder.  Clutch summed it up very well…

“National Review’s John Derbyshire says there is a talk that non-black Americans have with their children about race too. Derbyshire wrote about this in his post The Talk: Non-Black Version where he describes the racist views that he has instilled in his own children.

The outrageous content of his blog has many calling for him to be fired.

Here are 9 points he shares that every White parent should tell their children:

  • Avoid concentrations of blacks not all known to you personally.
  • Stay out of heavily black neighborhoods.
  • If planning a trip to a beach or amusement park at some date, find out whether it is likely to be swamped with blacks on that date (neglect of that one got me the closest I have ever gotten to death by gunshot).
  • Do not attend events likely to draw a lot of blacks.
  • If you are at some public event at which the number of blacks suddenly swells, leave as quickly as possible.
  • Do not settle in a district or municipality run by black politicians.
  • Before voting for a black politician, scrutinize his/her character much more carefully than you would a white.
  • Do not act the Good Samaritan to blacks in apparent distress, e.g., on the highway.
  • If accosted by a strange black in the street, smile and say something polite but keep moving.”

In my opinion, the most horrible point he makes in the article is…

(11) The mean intelligence of blacks is much lower than for whites. The least intelligent ten percent of whites have IQs below 81; forty percent of blacks have IQs that low. Only one black in six is more intelligent than the average white; five whites out of six are more intelligent than the average black. These differences show in every test of general cognitive ability that anyone, of any race or nationality, has yet been able to devise. They are reflected in countless everyday situations. “Life is an IQ test.”

It’s ridiculous.   To talk about IQs in this way makes him sound like a 1920s eugenicist.  It’s Asinine.  Big word for a black person. Yeah, I know.  If I was crazy enough to really entertain some hard facts and numbers from this writer, they would have tp come paired with empirical research on the impact of institutional racism, failing schools, low expectations, etc.  He states this point like it’s a fact.  For the link “in every test” he links to his own website like he is a scholar on the subject.    The URL has Opinion in the string ( because it’s just that.  His personal racist opinion.  No one should take this writer seriously.

Anyway, this is the most racist thing I’ve seen…today.

Note: “Derbyshire’s editor at the conservative publication National ReviewRich Lowry, described the piece as “appalling.”[17] On April 7, Lowry announced that Derbyshire had been dismissed from National Review: “We never would have published it, but the main reason that people noticed it is that it is by a National Review writer. Derb is effectively using our name to get more oxygen for views with which we’d never associate ourselves otherwise. So there has to be a parting of the ways.”[18]” – source


Filed under african american, black, culture, hate, news, opinion, race, racism, society, stereotype, white folks

Black vs. Mormon: Which one is more likely to get the RNC Nomination?

I’m being lazy and asking you guys some questions this week. :)

So, Herman Cain.  Really?  This guy is a joke right.  The Republicans are not really going to run this guy.  To me, he’s just as bad as Michelle B., the male and African-American version.  Are their strategists thinking that if you run 2 black people you’ll split the black vote or that color will not be a factor for minority voters and the issues will take center stage?  What is the strategy?  The fact that he’s getting so much air time for that 9-9-9 Sims economic plan is amazing.  Slow news cycle, maybe?  Come on, primary season.

I don’t see a Mormon getting the nod if the Evangelical Right has anything to say about it.  Um, I was raised Baptist and if Jehovah’s Witnesses aren’t thought to have the same religious beliefs, you know that Mormonism is going to be seen as a cult, basically.

So, a black guy and a white Mormon guy are at the top of the running.  Which one do you think has the best chance of getting the RNC nomination (if they both have any standing by next year)?  List some pros and cons if you have any or are conflicted with your choice.


Filed under african american, black, black man, media, news, opinion, politics, race, religion, society, washington dc

Should African Americans be More Supportive of Occupy Wall Street?

I’d like to know what my readers think about this.  Should Black People be drawn to this movement?  Should we consider Black unemployment rates and how many Blacks were affected by the housing crisis (Ponzi Scheme/Gambling in my opinion.) as motivation?  Here are a few recent takes on it.

More African Americans Encouraged to Join Occupy Movement – Washington Informer

Occupy protesters eye diversity as movement grows – Boston Globe

Occupy Wall Street Is About AfricanAmericans, Too – News One

What do you think?

Bonus Question: Is it just me or does the lack of Tea Party involvement or even a thumbs-up or two in the direction of the protesters make it seem even more as if they are the Party of the Rich and of Tax Loopholes?  Oh my bad “Job Creators”.   LOL!  Don’t you love it when people try to reclaim and rename what is and has always been.  No no, not slave owners…”Antebellum Job Creators”.  Sad.


Filed under african american, black man, black women, business, community, culture, government, money, news, opinion, politics, race, society

“The Help”: Is it just me or…

…are black people not feeling this movie trailer?  I’ve witnessed a very conflicted reaction to the trailer of the new movie “The Help” recently, in a movie theater that was filled with black folk.  Conflicted is the best way I can describe the mix of disgust and curiosity.  Am I surprised? No. It’s 2011, but the subject matter and images still sting.  Nothing like a dark-skinned black woman serving white folks in a maids uniform…in a period movie…set in the deep south.  Sigh.  Especially when it centers around a classic white savior character.  Since it takes place during the Civil Rights era, I think the author could have done a better job of developing the black lead character.  However, would Hollywood even make such a movie if it didn’t have a white lead?  I don’t know.

Unlike a lot of people I know, I read the book last year.  I can see how the movie trailer is off-putting without the book as reference.  I had some problems with the book, but overall I thought it was a decent read given the full context of who wrote it and the back story presented.  At times, reading it was heart wrenching for me as a black woman whose family is from Mississippi (mom’s side) and who’s great-grandmother was a maid for several white families.  Parts of the story were plain old scary, as racism sometimes is.

I don’t know for sure how this movie is going to be received by the black community.  I think Michele Wallace’s recent review in Essence is dead on (if they post it to the site, I’ll link to it).  In my opinion, this is not going to be a celebrated movie (like “The Color Purple”), but I’m glad that great actresses like Viola Davis and Cicely Tyson are taking on the roles in this film so that they are played with dignity.

One more point that doesn’t help: A Maid Sees Herself in a Novel, and Objects – Yep, a black maid, named Ablene, that worked for Kathryn Stockett’s older brother is suing her.  Dag! At least name the main black character in your book something other than your brother’s REAL, black maid’s name.  Come on!  To add insult, the woman says that part of the storyline was taken from her life.

NY Times | “Ablene Cooper, a 60-year-old woman who has long worked as a maid here, has filed a lawsuit against Kathryn Stockett, the author of the best-selling novel “The Help,” about black maids working for white families in Jackson in the 1960s.

In the complaint, Ms. Cooper argues that one of the book’s principal characters, Aibileen Clark, is an unpermitted appropriation of her name and image, which she finds emotionally distressing.

It is more complicated than that. For the past dozen years, Ms. Cooper has worked for Ms. Stockett’s older brother, Robert, and sister-in-law, Carroll, and still does.

“Ain’t too many Ablenes,” Ms. Cooper said at a law office after a day’s work at the Stocketts, for whom she has helped raise two children. Ms. Cooper also said that she had their support in her legal quest.

“What she did, they said it was wrong,” Ms. Cooper said of the Stocketts, members of a prominent Jackson family. “They came to me and said, ‘Ms. Aibee, we love you, we support you,’ and they told me to do what I got to do.””

Quote from Viola Davis in the August issue of Essence magazine:

”Of course I had trepidations. Why do I have to play the mammy? But what do you do as an actor if one of the most multifaceted and rich roles you’ve ever been given is a maid in 1962 Mississippi? Do you not take the role because you feel like in some ways it’s not a good message to send to Black people? No. The message is the quality of the work. That is the greater message… As Black women, we’re always given these seemingly devastating experiences – experiences that could absolutely break us. But what the caterpillar calls the end of the world, the master calls the butterfly. What we do as Black women is take the worst situations and create from that point.”


Filed under african american, black, black women, celebrity, civil rights, history, hollywood, media, opinion, race, racism, society, women, youtube

So, We’re All Ugly Just Because Some People Aren’t Into Black Chicks?

Personal Opinion is not fact.  Asking men about their preferences when it comes to women and attaching some pseudoscience to it doesn’t make your research air tight.  I need someone to explain the concept of opinion polls to the blogger over at Psychology Today who had the audacity to try to pass his bias off as science.  The title of the blog post I’m talking about is “Why Are Black Women Less Physically Attractive Than Other Women? Why black women, but not black men?”. Psychology Today has since taken the post down, but you can read it here.  You can read more about this here as well.

Here’s an excerpt:

What accounts for the markedly lower average level of physical attractiveness among black women? Black women are on average much heavier than nonblack women. The mean body-mass index (BMI) at Wave III is 28.5 among black women and 26.1 among nonblack women. (Black and nonblack men do not differ in BMI: 27.0 vs. 26.9.) However, this is not the reason black women are less physically attractive than nonblack women. Black women have lower average level of physical attractiveness net of BMI. Nor can the race difference in intelligence (and the positive association between intelligence and physical attractiveness) account for the race difference in physical attractiveness among women. Black women are still less physically attractive than nonblack women net of BMI and intelligence. Net of intelligence, black men are significantly more physically attractive than nonblack men.

There are many biological and genetic differences between the races. However, such race differences usually exist in equal measure for both men and women. For example, because they have existed much longer in human evolutionary history, Africans have more mutations in their genomes than other races. And the mutation loads significantly decrease physical attractiveness (because physical attractiveness is a measure of genetic and developmental health). But since both black women and black men have higher mutation loads, it cannot explain why only black women are less physically attractive, while black men are, if anything, more attractive.

The only thing I can think of that might potentially explain the lower average level of physical attractiveness among black women is testosterone. Africans on average have higher levels of testosterone than other races, and testosterone, being an androgen (male hormone), affects the physical attractiveness of men and women differently. Men with higher levels of testosterone have more masculine features and are therefore more physically attractive. In contrast, women with higher levels of testosterone also have more masculine features and are therefore less physically attractive. The race differences in the level of testosterone can therefore potentially explain why black women are less physically attractive than women of other races, while (net of intelligence) black men are more physically attractive than men of other races.

Personally, I’m outraged about this.  Not surprised, but outraged.  Black women birth black babies and further the black race.  Thus, “they” must attack, berate, and abuse us in the media or otherwise.  Don’t believe me?  Google “Michelle Obama”.

There is also a long history of psychology research focusing on the suggested inferiority of Black people.  Has history taught us nothing?  It has taught us to know racist and eugenic talk from the psychological community a mile a way.

To the author:
You might as well use “negroid” or “ape-like” in your piece, Mr. Kanazawa.  “The only thing I can think of…”, you say??  That sounds like you are trying to pass off your opinions as fact.  Beauty has always been in the eye of the beholder.  Just say that you don’t find black women attractive and that your opinion is shared by some other men.  This is America and we have the right to voice or opinions.  We all know what color Barbie is and that the European standard of beauty is the STANDARD.  You as an Asian man know the struggles that Asian women go through trying to conform.  As a person of color, you should realize how people of color in America see themselves differently than how those outside of their race see them.

Black women are not less attractive, as your title states.  Opinion is just opinion.  Men just like what they like.  As an old song said, “If you don’t like it, don’t knock it.   Somebody else might wanna rock it.”


  • What is “AddHealth”?
  • Who paid for this study?


Filed under african american, beauty, black women, culture, love, opinion, race, racism, relationships, sex, society, white folks, women

Possible Modern Day Lynching Ruled Suicide in Mississippi

This situation is just not adding up for me.  A 26 year-old black man with a history of mental illness was found hanging from a tree in the predominantly white housing area of Greenwood, MS after he wandered off on Dec 1, 2010.   Greenwood, in the Mississippi Delta, is in the same county as Money, Miss., where 14-year-old Emmett Till was infamously lynched in 1955.

There are of course no witnesses and not much mention of how he would have been able to hang himself.  As far as I know, hanging one’s self without assistance is difficult at best.  Police say there was no visible sign that the body had been tampered with and there was no initial physical evidence that would indicate it could be murder. I know police need evidence.  I understand that.  However, in terms of a suicide this is not a typical scenario.

USA Today – “The county sheriff says that a 26-year-old black man found hanged from an oak tree in Greenwood, Miss., apparently committed suicide, but the president of the local NAACP challenges that explanation and says the group will monitor developments in the case.

Frederick Jermaine Carter, whose body was found Friday in North Greenwood, had a history of mental illness, was on medication and had a pattern of wandering away, says Leflore County Sheriff Ricky Banks.

Carter, who lived in neighboring Sunflower County, was helping his stepfather paint a building Wednesday. The stepfather went to get tools and when he returned, Carter had wandered off, Banks says.

“That really didn’t bother the stepdaddy,” Banks says. “It had happened so many times before. He’s a mental patient and was taking medication. He had wandered to Florida, to Arkansas.”

After Carter was found Friday, Banks says he investigated the scene and found no evidence that anyone else was there. “I didn’t see any indication of anybody else being in that area, going from physical evidence and the general tracks,” Banks says. “He had on a sort of new pair of tennis shoes that had a most distinct track with an unusual design.”

“We tracked him where he walked in there,” he says. “No other tracks followed his tracks. He walked in there by himself. There were no signs around the tree where he was hanging.””

I’m skeptical given the young man’s metal state and the difficulty of doing something like this outside in the woods.  I’ve only read one article (out of 10 so far) that notes how he might have done this.

“”There was an old table, just a frame of an old table right up at the tree. It looked like he used that frame to stand up on and then kicked it out from under him,” Banks said.He said the man’s jacket pocket held a bundle of braided rope like the rope around his neck.” source

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Filed under african american, black, black man, black men, crime, news, opinion, race, society

Complete this Sentence: Psychologists told Black People to stop spanking their kids and now…

Finish this sentence for me, people:  “Psychologists told Black People to stop spanking their kids and now…”  You can leave a comment below.

Why do I ask?  Crazy “youngins” on the metro this morning.

If you live in DC, you know that African-American kids can act a dignified fool on the metro trains.  I blame this on the fact that many black parents stopped spanking their kids and strayed from the time-tested methods of discipline that worked for our foremothers and forefathers.

Do you think Martin Luther King was put in time out?  Did Ruby Dee and Ossie Davis have to sit there and think about what they’d done…and then write a letter to their victim as punishment?  I would venture to say that many a famous negro of yesteryear received proper spankings.  I’m not talking extension cords, big wooden boards,  and other out of the ordinary stuff.  I’m not talking about anything that leaves bruises or welts.  Spanking with a hand or belt, NOT beatings.  You can disagree with me and if you think it’s abuse, you’re entitled to your opinion.  As am I.


Filed under african american, black, black history, children, culture, d.c., opinion, society, youth

The New American Caste System?

Poor is the new Black.

Now that I have your attention.  What do I mean by that?  America is a society where historically someone (or some group such as women) has to be “the lower caste”.  I have a feeling that the rising number of poor people in America just may become the new “Out” group.  By using the word “caste” I mean to put emphasis on the fact that in the near future people may not be able to raise themselves up out of poverty by their book straps, just as for generations many people in places like India have never escaped the stigma of the caste they were born into.  I wonder if we are seeing the foundations of a society where poor is the new untouchable.

Will race still be a factor in the way groups are divided up in the U.S.?  Sure, but let’s face it, my fellow Negroes.  Many of us are educated enough and make enough money were we don’t have to worry about the daily trials and tribulations faced by our fellow American who live below the poverty line.  Sure, there is still racism to content with.  But you cold, hard, green cash and plastic is accepted as widely as Visa most of the time.  Race is not the main qualifier in the American caste system these days.

However, I’m also not ignoring the fact that many blacks are in the ranks of the poor as well…every ethnic group is. White, Black, Brown, Red, Yellow…Technicolor…doesn’t matter.  If you don’t have money in America, you are in a really tight spot right now.

Ask someone who doesn’t have a job.  Ask a recent grad who’s been looking for work since January.  Ask a Baby Boomer who keeps being told they are over qualified, but they look in the interviewer’s eyes which seem to say, “You’re too old for us to take the chance that you’ll wreak havoc on our insurance policy and we already have too many folks on disability.”

I was just reading this morning that U.S. Income inequality is at its highest level since the Census started tracking it in 1967 (Gini Index).  The number of U.S. households getting food stamps increased by 2 million last year to 11.7 million.  This is the highest number on record.  That means 1 in 10 families are getting government aid to feed themselves.

If we keep going in this direction, how poor you are will determine your place in society more than how Black you are.  A caste system focused on economical attainment is not far-fetched.


Filed under african american, black, black men, black women, culture, opinion, race, society

Ninja, Pleassse! You sho is crazy, Ninja!

Black people, I have to say that I found this “Ninja, Say What?” video to be very informative.  As I watched it I said to myself, mmm…Black folk must really, really sound crazy sometimes depending on who is listening in on us using the one word we don’t want others to use.

Tell me what you think.


Filed under art, culture, funny, n-word, race, society, stereotype, video, youtube

Grand Isle and the Oil Spill: Karma is a Bitch

They say that what you do unto others will be done unto you.  Now, trust me…I have compassion for the people currently effected by the oil spill.  People are losing their livelihoods and some have lost their lives.  However, I just have to say that I just see an irony in this mess.  A very, very sad irony.  Jefferson Parish officials refused to help people suffering during Katrina and now, parts of the parish are in need.

“And despite constant warnings from Jefferson Parish officials about oil approaching Grand Isle late last week, the boats needed to stop it weren’t around when they were needed. As a result, oil washed up on beaches and authorities in Jefferson “commandeered” shrimp boats from BP in order to get booms out to the passes near the island.” source

One of the most compelling during the Katrina disaster came from two white paramedics from San Francisco who were among those trapped in the city after the hurricane.  They were turned away on a bridge by Jefferson Parish police:

“”The police commander came across the street to address our group. He told us he had a solution: we should walk to the Pontchartrain Expressway and cross the greater New Orleans Bridge to the south side of the Mississippi, where the police had buses lined up to take us out of the city…We organized ourselves, and the 200 of us set off for the bridge with great excitement and hope. As we marched past the convention center, many locals saw our determined and optimistic group, and asked where we were headed. We told them about the great news. Families immediately grabbed their few belongings, and quickly, our numbers doubled and then doubled again. Babies in strollers now joined us, as did people using crutches, elderly clasping walkers and other people in wheelchairs. We marched the two to three miles to the freeway and up the steep incline to the bridge…

As we approached the bridge, armed sheriffs formed a line across the foot of the bridge. Before we were close enough to speak, they began firing their weapons over our heads. This sent the crowd fleeing in various directions. As the crowd scattered and dissipated, a few of us inched forward and managed to engage some of the sheriffs in conversation. We told them of our conversation with the police commander and the commander’s assurances. The sheriffs informed us that there were no buses waiting. The commander had lied to us to get us to move. We questioned why we couldn’t cross the bridge anyway, especially as there was little traffic on the six-lane highway. They responded that the West Bank was not going to become New Orleans, and there would be no Superdomes in their city…All day long, we saw other families, individuals and groups make the same trip up the incline in an attempt to cross the bridge, only to be turned away—some chased away with gunfire, others simply told no, others verbally berated and humiliated. Thousands of New Orleaners were prevented and prohibited from self-evacuating the city on foot. (Bradshaw and Slonsky 2005)”

When questioned about these incidents later, the Jefferson Parish Sheriff confirmed that his office closed the bridge, explaining that his Parish did not have the resources to care for thousands of needy people.” source

Other Accounts:
Evacuees Were Turned Away at Gretna, La. : NPR

Jefferson Parish Sheriff
asks to be taken off of lawsuit | –

I wonder what the citizens of Jefferson Parish thought about the events on that bridge back then?  I wonder what they think about the responsiblity of all of us to care for the needy now?


Filed under community, history, injustice, katrina, news, opinion, racism, society