Tag Archives: beauty

So, We’re All Ugly Just Because Some People Aren’t Into Black Chicks?

Personal Opinion is not fact.  Asking men about their preferences when it comes to women and attaching some pseudoscience to it doesn’t make your research air tight.  I need someone to explain the concept of opinion polls to the blogger over at Psychology Today who had the audacity to try to pass his bias off as science.  The title of the blog post I’m talking about is “Why Are Black Women Less Physically Attractive Than Other Women? Why black women, but not black men?”. Psychology Today has since taken the post down, but you can read it here.  You can read more about this here as well.

Here’s an excerpt:

What accounts for the markedly lower average level of physical attractiveness among black women? Black women are on average much heavier than nonblack women. The mean body-mass index (BMI) at Wave III is 28.5 among black women and 26.1 among nonblack women. (Black and nonblack men do not differ in BMI: 27.0 vs. 26.9.) However, this is not the reason black women are less physically attractive than nonblack women. Black women have lower average level of physical attractiveness net of BMI. Nor can the race difference in intelligence (and the positive association between intelligence and physical attractiveness) account for the race difference in physical attractiveness among women. Black women are still less physically attractive than nonblack women net of BMI and intelligence. Net of intelligence, black men are significantly more physically attractive than nonblack men.

There are many biological and genetic differences between the races. However, such race differences usually exist in equal measure for both men and women. For example, because they have existed much longer in human evolutionary history, Africans have more mutations in their genomes than other races. And the mutation loads significantly decrease physical attractiveness (because physical attractiveness is a measure of genetic and developmental health). But since both black women and black men have higher mutation loads, it cannot explain why only black women are less physically attractive, while black men are, if anything, more attractive.

The only thing I can think of that might potentially explain the lower average level of physical attractiveness among black women is testosterone. Africans on average have higher levels of testosterone than other races, and testosterone, being an androgen (male hormone), affects the physical attractiveness of men and women differently. Men with higher levels of testosterone have more masculine features and are therefore more physically attractive. In contrast, women with higher levels of testosterone also have more masculine features and are therefore less physically attractive. The race differences in the level of testosterone can therefore potentially explain why black women are less physically attractive than women of other races, while (net of intelligence) black men are more physically attractive than men of other races.

Personally, I’m outraged about this.  Not surprised, but outraged.  Black women birth black babies and further the black race.  Thus, “they” must attack, berate, and abuse us in the media or otherwise.  Don’t believe me?  Google “Michelle Obama”.

There is also a long history of psychology research focusing on the suggested inferiority of Black people.  Has history taught us nothing?  It has taught us to know racist and eugenic talk from the psychological community a mile a way.

To the author:
You might as well use “negroid” or “ape-like” in your piece, Mr. Kanazawa.  “The only thing I can think of…”, you say??  That sounds like you are trying to pass off your opinions as fact.  Beauty has always been in the eye of the beholder.  Just say that you don’t find black women attractive and that your opinion is shared by some other men.  This is America and we have the right to voice or opinions.  We all know what color Barbie is and that the European standard of beauty is the STANDARD.  You as an Asian man know the struggles that Asian women go through trying to conform.  As a person of color, you should realize how people of color in America see themselves differently than how those outside of their race see them.

Black women are not less attractive, as your title states.  Opinion is just opinion.  Men just like what they like.  As an old song said, “If you don’t like it, don’t knock it.   Somebody else might wanna rock it.”

Questions

  • What is “AddHealth”?
  • Who paid for this study?

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Is Gabourey Sidibe Attractive or Are People Being Nice?

Most people would never call a person ugly or fat to their face unless they wanted to hurt the other person’s feelings.  Howard Stern is not one of those people.  He’s make a living saying whatever he wants about whom ever he wants.  He recently made some comments about “Precious” star, Gabourey Sidibe.

Stern drew criticism from the mainstream media for his comments about Gabourey Sidibe’s appearance at the Academy Awards. Howard Stern said: “There’s the most enormous, fat black chick I’ve ever seen. Everyone’s pretending she’s a part of show business and she’s never going to be in another movie.”

Howard Stern played clips of reporters from mainstream media outlets fuming over his frank statements about Gabourey Sidibe’s weight on Wednesday, and then responded by saying: “Obesity in this country is out of control….What’s really sad though is that there are people who say it’s okay to be this heavy. You’ve got to love your body, you’ve got to embrace it.” – Washington Examiner

What do you think readers? We all know that sometimes things are said because they are nice, but they are not realistic.  Let’s face it, people lie.   Is it realistic to think that in a society that is obsessed with physical beauty and perfection that a person of Gabourey’s size will have a vibrant film career?  If she was not a famous actress, would people call her beautiful? If we acknowledge the skin color politics of the black community, how does that figure into this conversation?  I want you guys to think about this honestly. If this were your child, what perspective would you give her about what people may be saying in her face and what they might be saying behind her back?

(Note: She recently landed a role on Showtime’s “Big C” playing a “smart-mouthed student“.  Um…don’t large black women have a history of playing smart mouthed maids, friends, students, etc.  Typecast!)

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Black Womanhood at Dartmouth

I’m an art lover so I thought I’d share.  I’m excited about this exhibit.  Should in the vicinity of Dartmouth before August 10, you should go see this exhibit at the Hood Museum of Art.

portrait
Maud Sulter, Scottish (1960-2008)Terpsichore, 1989

Cate McQuaid/Globe Correspondent writes:

“”Black Womanhood” aches with old wounds, probed tenderly by artists who still contend with these scars and restrictions. It has a mighty scope, embracing topics such as the spice trade, Josephine Baker, African initiation rituals, and homophobia in South Africa.

The paradigm it sets up Continue reading

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Stacy Dash may have a covenant with the devil

How the hell does she look this good at 42 years old?? How? I know black doesn’t crack…but it does age.  I swear she much have a deal, a covenant agreement with Satan himself. You know I wouldn’t usually post a backshot, black men’s magazine picture like this, but dag. Can someone just bottle her DNA and sell it? I’d buy.

stacy dash on the cover of king

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Black Women and the Fear of Natural, Nappy Hair

Wigs, weaves, extensions and chemical relaxers are examples of how hair is socially, psychologically, and culturally significant to the black female experience
By The Star.com
As a black woman living in Canada, I often feel invisible when it comes to my natural hair. The television series da Kink In My Hair (which just wrapped up its first season on Global television) taps into a lot of the issues black women have with hair, but on the streets of Toronto, it’s a whole other story.

Some people might be offended by what I have to say, and others might think: “It’s just hair. Get a life.” Fair enough. But, since freeing myself from the dependency of chemically relaxing my hair every eight weeks, I feel it important to use my voice.

Too many black women can’t remember what it’s like to feel their natural hair. I know several, who have not felt their scalp since Bobby Brown was a member of New Edition. And I have sat in hair salons with women who spend more money on their hair than their education.

I also know a lot of black women who secretly want to go natural, but fear the reaction at work, what their family will say, even that their partner will leave them. If hair is just hair, you’d think going natural would be just as easy as processing your hair.

Then there are weaves, a process by which synthetic or real hair is sewn into one’s natural hair to give the appearance of long, flowing, straight hair. While many women, irrespective of race, wear weaves (they’re common in Hollywood), black women wear them to cover up, not merely enhance, their natural state.

Talk about hair is so woven into the black female experience that people often make jokes about who has “good hair” and who has “bad hair.” In the song “I Am Not My Hair,” India Aries sings, “Good hair means curls and waves/Bad hair means you look like a slave.” A lot of people might not have a clue as to what she’s talking about, but, as a black woman, I sure do. Continue reading

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Putting an End to the “N” and “H” Words

I personally think it is a lost cause to try to single out words and stop people from using them.  Educating people as to what they are saying…the history and impact…I’m all for that.  However, if I wanna say, “Yo, sup my Nig” to someone in passing…who’s going to know.  Who’s going to monitor that?  What about Johns on the street who are soliciting actual hoes…are we going to ask that they use “Hey, prostitute!” or “Excuse me, hooker.”??

From Feministing.com

Don Imus is back on the air. Not that I need to remind you, but here’s a little recap of what lead to the Imus debacle:

IMUS: That’s some rough girls from Rutgers. Man, they got tattoos and—
McGUIRK: Some hard-core hos…
IMUS: That’s some nappy-headed hos there…. And the girls from Tennessee, they all look cute…
McGUIRK: A Spike Lee thing…
McGUIRK: The Jigaboos vs. the Wannabes — that movie that he had.

“That movie that he had” is School Daze. In the film, the Wannabees, like “the girls from Tennessee,” are considered good-looking because they are light-skinned with “good hair” (read: straight or wavy, most likely from being chemically processed). The Jigaboos, on the other hand, who have darker skin and natural hair (“nappy”), are considered less attractive.

In this context, by using “nappy-headed” to describe the natural hair texture of African Americans, Imus suggests that Black people in their natural state are ugly.

In a culture where women are largely valued on their physical appearance, those who don’t fit conventional standards of beauty are deemed less worthy of respect. It is only natural that many of us have internalized these ideals.

And the representation of Black people in the media doesn’t help Black women develop a healthy self image or contribute to others forming a positive view of Black people. Stereotypical images of Black men and women have been fairly consistent from early 20th century minstrelsy, through the Blaxploitation era of the 70’s, to today. Continue reading

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