Tag Archives: black

Black vs. Mormon: Which one is more likely to get the RNC Nomination?

I’m being lazy and asking you guys some questions this week. :)

So, Herman Cain.  Really?  This guy is a joke right.  The Republicans are not really going to run this guy.  To me, he’s just as bad as Michelle B., the male and African-American version.  Are their strategists thinking that if you run 2 black people you’ll split the black vote or that color will not be a factor for minority voters and the issues will take center stage?  What is the strategy?  The fact that he’s getting so much air time for that 9-9-9 Sims economic plan is amazing.  Slow news cycle, maybe?  Come on, primary season.

I don’t see a Mormon getting the nod if the Evangelical Right has anything to say about it.  Um, I was raised Baptist and if Jehovah’s Witnesses aren’t thought to have the same religious beliefs, you know that Mormonism is going to be seen as a cult, basically.

So, a black guy and a white Mormon guy are at the top of the running.  Which one do you think has the best chance of getting the RNC nomination (if they both have any standing by next year)?  List some pros and cons if you have any or are conflicted with your choice.


Filed under african american, black, black man, media, news, opinion, politics, race, religion, society, washington dc

Should African Americans be More Supportive of Occupy Wall Street?

I’d like to know what my readers think about this.  Should Black People be drawn to this movement?  Should we consider Black unemployment rates and how many Blacks were affected by the housing crisis (Ponzi Scheme/Gambling in my opinion.) as motivation?  Here are a few recent takes on it.

More African Americans Encouraged to Join Occupy Movement – Washington Informer

Occupy protesters eye diversity as movement grows – Boston Globe

Occupy Wall Street Is About AfricanAmericans, Too – News One

What do you think?

Bonus Question: Is it just me or does the lack of Tea Party involvement or even a thumbs-up or two in the direction of the protesters make it seem even more as if they are the Party of the Rich and of Tax Loopholes?  Oh my bad “Job Creators”.   LOL!  Don’t you love it when people try to reclaim and rename what is and has always been.  No no, not slave owners…”Antebellum Job Creators”.  Sad.


Filed under african american, black man, black women, business, community, culture, government, money, news, opinion, politics, race, society

What does Michele Bachmann know about the African-American community?

I’m confused.  I know that all the potential Republican candidates are basically competing on the airwaves to see who can bash Obama best.  However, Michele Bachmann has tacked on some  promises to her usual President bashing in this video that I’m don’t think she intends to keep.

“This president has failed the Hispanic community. He has failed the African-American community,” she said. “He has failed us all when it comes to jobs.” Um, just because your intern looked up some statistics online, does mean you understand the impact of joblessness in minority communities.

  • Is this how she appeals to Blacks and Latinos?  I guess we’re dumb enough to just believe numbers and not consider the context of our lives or who’s talking, huh?
  • Does she really, really intend to be a jobs champion for Blacks and Latinos?
  • Is equality and job creation in minority communities what the Tea Party has been fighting for all this time?  If so (you know that’s not so) that message has not been clear at all.

I’m very confused.   Is she running for President of the USA or President of the NAACP?  Is she trying to present at the next Alma Awards?  Please!!  People will say anything to get a vote.


Filed under african american, ecomonmic, news, obama, opinion, politics, race, washington, youth

The Black and the Irish: My 4 leaf clover is covered in bling

LOL. Moving on…

In honor of St. Patricks day, I looked into the connections between the Black and the Irish.  Here is some interesting info I’ve found.

  • A white buddy of mine had this to say about St. Patricks day:  “The history of Africans and Irish goes back much further than most people think. When the Roman Empire fell, Irish Christians preserved the last bit of Christianity in Western Europe for centuries. Irish monks actually kept in contact with Egyptian monks (by way of voyages on the Mediterranean through the Straits of Gibraltar and the North Atlantic). It is thought that the Celtic Cross was derived from the Egyptian ankh. “These would be the Egyptians of the Coptic Orthodox Church.
  • TangledRoots @ Yale.edu: Tangled Roots is a research project about the shared history of African Americans and Irish Americans.  They share some very interesting information about Africans and Irish in Barbados.
  • During the 1600’s, African slaves and Irish natives shared a common fate on the island of Barbados. Slaves first arrived on the island in the 1620’s with the first white settlers and continued to be brought there as the need for labor created a new market for the international slave trade. By 1645, the black population on the island was 5680, and by 1667, there were over 40,000 slaves on the island. In the early years of the colony’s growth, Barbados also became a destination for military prisoners and Irish natives. Oliver Cromwell “barbadosed” Irish who refused to clear off their land and allowed other Irish to be kidnaped from the streets of Ireland and transported to Barbados. Those who were barbadosed were sold as slaves or indentured servants, to British planters. They lived in slave conditions and had no control over the number of years they had to serve. The number of Barbadosed Irish in not known and estimates very widely, from a high of 60,000 to a low of 12,000.
  • The Healy Family : A question of Racial Identity
    An Irish immigrant and a mixed-race domestic slave raised children who became priests, including the fist African-American Bishop in the United States, a President of Georgetown University, a religious sister and a Coast Guard officer. These site documents the family history and consider the question of their racial identity.  Prologue: Racial Identity and the Case of Capt. Michael Healy


Filed under african american, black, culture, history, race, slavery, white folks

Happy “I’ze Married Now!” Day to All My Black DC Gays and Lesbians

I’m straight, but i’m no hater.  I want to give a congratulations shout out to all of the gay and lesbian folks in Washington, DC who can now get married.  The Washington Post reports that couples lined up beginning at 6 a.m. at the D.C. district courthouse, vying to be among the first same-sex couples to apply for marriage licenses.  Good for them. Whether it’s mixed race couples, couples from different sides of the tracks, or people who get married and everyone knows they shouldn’t…we all deserve to choose who we walk down the isle with.

When we start picking and chosing who gets what rights and who deserves what freedoms, we get onto a slippery slope.  There was a time when African Americans were not free to live where they wanted to live, marry who they loved, or just go have a burger at the local diner just because of the social norms and stereotypes that helped shape American law.  Discrimination was  the law.  Treating one group as lesser than another was the law.  I’m so glad to say that discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation when it comes to marriage is no longer the law here in the District.

PS: You better make sure that marriage comes with same-sex divorce too.  I’m just saying.  LOL

Photo: Michael K. Cole & Jamil Smith Cole. The two jumped over the broom Atlanta Georgia in 2009.

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Filed under african american, black, civil rights, community, culture, d.c., gay, government, news, opinion, relationships, society, washington, washington dc

Send Mother Dear a Check: AARP Survey Says Older Blacks Hit Hard By Recession

It’s time to dig into your pockets.  Dig like you’re in a church pew (I once heard in a church…from a pastor…”We like the money that jingles, but we love the money that folds”.  Sigh)  Time to send Mommy, “Mother Dear” and “Pop Pop” a check, brothers and sisters!

Kansas City Star:  The economic recession has had a “devastating impact” on African Americans age 45 and up, according to a new survey by AARP.

The survey, which is part of AARP’s continued look at how African Americans age 45 and older are faring in this economy, found that over the last year:

— 33 percent of African Americans age 45 and older had problems paying rent or mortgage.

— 44 percent had problems paying for essential items, such as food and utilities.

— 18 percent lost a job, nearly twice the rate of the general population.

— 23 percent lost their employer-sponsored health care.

If people who are of working age are doing pretty bad, I can’t imagine how the retirees and those on Social Security are managing. I’m reminded of those heating old and electric bill subsidy commercials that come on in the winter that always have some “assumed” poor, elderly African American in them. The person is always sitting at home by an old school electric heater, wrapped up in a blanket and wearing a hat. Those commercials remind me to call and check on my mom and my grandmother. This information makes me think I should cast my net of concern a little wider this time of year. Maybe we all should.

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Question: Who is this “We” people always refer to when talking about change in the Black community?

I’m looking for WE.  You know, the “WE” that Black journalists, commentators, business people, politicians, and pundits talk about when they are interviewed on television and radio.  When they say things like…

  • We need to educate our children and take back our communities.
  • We need to harness our socioeconomic power and influence corporations.
  • We need to support “X” and “Y” legislation.
  • We need to step up and be fathers, mothers, mentors, leaders, business people, etc.

Do you know who “We” is?

In my opinion, the homogeneous black WE is a figment of the imagination.  We as African-Americans are not of one economic or social strata.  We are not all college educated or high school drop outs.  We don’t all have the Cosby family dream or come from strong single mother households.  It is this reality that is overlooked when people call on the WE.

When you call out to someone who isn’t there…they don’t hear you.  Black America is not hearing the call of some of it’s best and brightest leaders because they aren’t calling US collectively.  We are not WE…we are YOU.  You are the poor sista on welfare who is looked down upon because she needs food stamps to survive.  You are the brother who was passed along by “No child left behind” so that the graduation rates would be acceptable.  You are the child who is told they can be a great as Martin Luther King, but faces a reality in their neighborhood that says they will be lucky to secure a decent paying job after high school graduation.

When we all see our brothers and sisters as ourselves we gain the perspective that compassion and understanding brings.  Advising from a place of understanding brings context, and context makes words relevant.  You must take on the challenges, differences, issues and problems and see them on a personal level.  Seek to understand, not just provide lip service.  Then we can go from You to US.  Community.  You are then able to speak to the community at large as well as segments of the community in the ways that are most effective.  From there we can move the community to action, because as we all know, actions speak louder than words.

I don’t think that many people I hear are talking about US when they say “We need to”.  I think they are really saying that “The Talented Tenth” needs to.  They may be saying “You people” need to.  I think the appeals and advice, no matter how good and well intentioned, is falling on deaf ears.  We need action plans and road maps to the future that are formulated to appeal to our diverse community.  Black History Month is a great time to consider whether it’s time for talking or time for us to build community and effect change.

Hello, Negro family, I’d love to know your thoughts on this.

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Filed under activism, african american, black, black men, black women, opinion

Real Housewives of Atlanta nominated for NAACP Image Award

The blogs are a buzzing this week with news that Bravo’s “Real Housewives of Atlanta” has been nominated for an NAACP Image award.   I agree with Bossip, someone should be fired.  I didn’t believe it a first.  I had to check the facts for myself on the NAACP website.  There it was:

Outstanding Reality Series

  • “American Idol 8” (FOX)
  • “America’s Next Top Model” (CW)
  • “Dancing With the Stars” (ABC)
  • “Extreme Makeover” (ABC)
  • “Real Housewives of Atlanta” (Bravo)

Someone please tell me this is a hoax.  Next they will be giving Kisha Cole’s momma an Image Award.  Hell, I know Mr. Brown is bound to get nominated in the “Step n’ Fetch it” category.  This tops their nomination of R. Kelly…

…well, maybe not.  Where am I?  Someone please tell me this is just a dream.


Filed under african american, black women, opinion, television, why, women

You Can Check “Negro” on This Year’s Census. Yippee!

NPR is reporting that the US Census has slipped up and put “Negro” on the 2010 form.  You guys know that I have a special place in my heart for this word (see the title of this blog).  They claim they added it because some older African-Americans wrote it on the form in previous years.  Really?  I need to call Mother Dear and tell her not to do that.  It’s 2010.  I wonder if they actually considered adding in “colored” as well.

Census Bureau, do you really have to think about these things?  Really!?!?  DC is a few min away from their Suitland MD offices.  I might need to send a letter or something.

I’m not surprised.  I think someone may have been lashing out in a form of anti-Obama style protest.  It reminds me of when that artist put a penis in the art work of the Little Mermaid VHS cover.  Here’s the sccop from NPR.Org


Photo: From the 2010 questionaire. (Census.gov)

By Mark Memmott, NPR.org

The Census Bureau says it has included “Negro” as a way for individuals to classify their race in the 2010 Census because some older African-Americans wrote it on their forms in 2000.

But many African-Americans find it insulting.

— “It’s almost like a slap in the face,” Nikyle Fitzgerald tells WTOL in Toledo.

— “I am a little offended,” Dawud Ingram says to WCBS-TV.

— “It’s a bad vibe word,” Kevin Bishop says in the New York Daily News.

We’ve asked Census for some historical background on when the word has been used in the past. We’ll update with that information.


Filed under african american, black, black men, black women, culture, government, negro, news, opinion, why

Pool Boots Kids Who Might “Change the Complexion”

Somebody pinch me. Is it 2009 or 1959? I’m just wondering after reading this article. No “minorities”, huh?  From NBC in Philly:

“I heard this lady, she was like, ‘Uh, what are all these black kids doing here?’ She’s like, ‘I’m scared they might do something to my child,'” said camper Dymire Baylor.

The Creative Steps Day Camp paid more than $1900 to The Valley Swim Club. The Valley Swim Club is a private club that advertises open membership. But the campers’ first visit to the pool suggested otherwise.

“When the minority children got in the pool all of the Caucasian children immediately exited the pool,” Horace Gibson, parent of a day camp child, wrote in an email. “The pool attendants came and told the black children that they did not allow minorities in the club and needed the children to leave immediately.

The response from the club was…sad [horrible, actually]

“There was concern that a lot of kids would change the complexion … and the atmosphere of the club,” John Duesler, President of The Valley Swim Club said in a statement.

Atmosphere…I agree.  Complexion, that too, but he is crazy to admit it to a news outlet.  I mean, hide your racism.  Don’t you know how?

Again I say…this is NOT a post-racial America.


Filed under african american, black, children, culture, injustice, news, race, racism, student, white folks, why, youth