Tag Archives: election

Lando Calrissian as Obama, Emperor Palpatine as McCain

[funnyordie a863be2b6f]
Very Funny.  If you are from DC you’ll notice that Lando like to travel in the DC metro system. They used a photo of the interior of a DC metro station as one of the back drops. Billy Dee is too funny…all serious and all. LOL

Thanks to the DCist for posting this.

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Reflections on the Cost of Silence

This is How Fascism Comes: Reflections on the Cost of Silence
By Tim Wise – October 12, 2008

For those who have seen the ugliness and heard the vitriol emanating from the mouths of persons attending McCain/Palin rallies this past week–what with their demands to kill Barack Obama, slurs that he is a terrorist and a traitor, and paranoid delusions about his crypto-Muslim designs on America–please know this: This is how fascism comes to an ostensible democracy.

If it comes–and if those whose poisonous, unhinged verbiage has been so ubiquitous this week have any say over it, it surely will–this is how it will happen: not with tanks and jackbooted storm troopers, but carried in the hearts of men and women dressed in comfortable shoes, with baseball caps, and What Would Jesus Do? wristbands. It will be heralded by up-dos, designer glasses, you-betcha folksiness and a disdain for big words or hard consonants. Continue reading

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Wassup 2008

I love this!

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I Voted!!!

I just got in from voting. In the past, voting in DC was easy. The only long lines were in the actual building where you voted. Not this time, to my great pleasure. I was so excited to see the long line in my old neighborhood, wrapping around the building, down the hill, and approaching the main thoroughfare. And this was all before 7AM when the polls opened. Some brought lawn chairs with them. Someone even left their car radio on to help make the time go by. It was a beautiful sight to see. I’m not a DC transplant, like a lot of the current DC residents. I’m a native of the District of Columbia, raised in the area known to some as the continent of Southeast…LOL. I’m sure I had a huge grin on my face as I greeted my neighbors of every age. They grinned back as they greeted me. The highlight of it all was the display that the first guy to vote gave. He came out with a real slow pimp to his step. He held his hands up waiting for our applause (which we, of course, gave as we cheered). He took out a bottle of water and poured some to his right and left for the ancestors and all those that didn’t make it too see this day and then he drank. It was hilarious and moving at the same time because he was mostly serious. He shouted some things to us that I won’t repeat, but let’s just say he was preaching to the choir. Continue reading

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Do Not Wear Obama Shirts to the Polls: It’s not personal, it’s just the law

Wouldn’t you just know it…another way to hinder people from voting…tisk tisk.

Mr. T in DC gave the heads up to Washington DC folk on his blog about this (below). It’s basically like walking into your polling place with a big campaign sign. This isn’t a concert :) it’s a democratic process, so I’m sure we can all put a jacket over our shirts till we get back into the car, turn it inside out…or something. LOL

I’m sure may be the case in other cities…states Virginia Board Adopts Ban on Campaign Clothing . We dont’ want anyone to told to go back home and change shirts before they can vote on election day. PASS THIS INFO ON!!!! Find out what the LAW is regarding polling places and Campaign Clothing in your state.

One of my (many) worries about the upcoming election is that Democratic voters will be turned away in large numbers because they’re wearing Obama tee shirts. The issue hasn’t really come up before, because typically you don’t get a ton of people wearing tee shirt supporting presidential candidates, but this election is different. With Obama being the first African-American candidate running for president, the black community is enthusiastic about him to the point where a cottage industry has arisen in Obama tee shirts and other paraphernalia. Anecdotally, I see more people walking around in Obama-attire than in all previous elections combined. Obama tee shirts are all over DC.

The catch is that wearing such tee shirts is not allowed in the polling places, as it is considered the same as waving around a campaign sign. That seems fair, but the federal and local governments should make sure they get the word out about the rule, so that thousands of African-American voters aren’t turned away, disappointed, on election day. It would be horrible if the election turns on a strictly enforced interpretation of this rule. I hope that others will help spread the word: it may seem a good idea, but do not wear your Obama tee shirt on election day.

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Pastors endorsing McCain over the Pulpit

This is hardly news to me because I recall this kind of activity during other elections, most memorably, the 2004 election when people were urged to “vote your conscience”. This is, however, a blatant attempt to override the 54 year old ban on political endorsements by tax-exempt entities. I’m assuming these 30+ plus pastors are endorsing McCain because of his views on abortion and homosexuality. There’s an interesting video on CNN. Let’s see how they fare with the IRS, because I also remember Bush going after the NAACP for criticizing the Bush Administration. Oh wait, I think the “vote your conscience” pastors got by just fine… I’m sure there are pastors endorsing Obama, but I’m sure they aren’t crazy enough to taunt the IRS. Chris Rock is right, Republicans just make up their own rules…

The Washington Post

CROWN POINT, Ind., Sept. 28 — Defying a federal law that prohibits U.S. clergy from endorsing political candidates from the pulpit, an evangelical Christian minister told his congregation Sunday that voting for Sen. Barack Obama would be evidence of “severe moral schizophrenia.”

The Rev. Ron Johnson Jr. told worshipers that the Democratic presidential nominee’s positions on abortion and gay partnerships exist “in direct opposition to God’s truth as He has revealed it in the Scriptures.” Johnson showed slides contrasting the candidates’ views but stopped short of endorsing Obama’s Republican opponent, Sen. John McCain.

Johnson and 32 other pastors across the country set out Sunday to break the rules, hoping to generate a legal battle that will prompt federal courts to throw out a 54-year-old ban on political endorsements by tax-exempt houses of worship.

The ministers contend they have a constitutional right to advise their worshipers how to vote. As Johnson put it during a break between sermons, “The point that the IRS says you can’t do it, I’m saying you’re wrong.”

The campaign, organized by the Alliance Defense Fund, a socially conservative legal consortium based in Arizona, has gotten the attention of the Internal Revenue Service. The agency, alerted by opponents, pledged to “monitor the situation and take action as appropriate.”

Each campaign season brings allegations that a member of the clergy has crossed a line set out in a 1954 amendment to the tax code that says nonprofit, tax-exempt entities may not “participate in, or intervene in . . . any political campaign on behalf of any candidate for public office.”

This time, the church action is concerted. Yet while the ministers say the rules stifle religious expression, their opponents contend that the tax laws are essential to protect the separation of church and state. They say political speech should not be supported by a tax break for the churches or the worshipers who are contributing to a political cause. Continue reading

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Barack Obama – The Antichrist???

Sista can vouch for me that I predicted that Barack would be called the Antichrist. I just didn’t want to post it to give anybody any ideas… This video does not come out and say that he’s the Antichrist, but that’s the way that it’s being interpretted. I can see how it’s poking fun at people’s adoration of Barack, but if it’s viewed as a suggestion that he’s the Antichrist you know some cautious Christians will be compelled to “vote their conscience” once again in 2008. McCain can put us in another war or keep us in Iraq for 100 years, but at least he’s not the Antichrist, huh…This is a mess…

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Nas on Racism, Obama, and of course “Nas World”

Nas is readying his latest LP and the legendary emcee is also being his regular outspoken self. Recently, he spoke out on racism and how it affects him and how it may affect Democratic nominee Barack Obama.

“I get reminders,” Nas recently said in an interview with MTV. “I see a lot of people get reminders all the time. But the president of the United States? I don’t know. He can expect that everything that can happen, will happen. But he’s a lot more powerful than Nasir Jones in a lot of ways. I think he’ll be all right. People like me, we’re gonna deal with [racism]. There’s a lot of ignorance in the world. Look at the human family. We’ve been able to design iPods and so-called go the Moon. Yet, we can’t get over racial difference and colors of skin. That’s gotta go.”

“If Barack becomes the president, it doesn’t matter who looks at him as a n—er at that point…Everybody gotta go through scrutiny, criticism by crazy people. They will criticize your child. They talked about the Clintons‘ daughter, and they talked about this one and that one. You gotta be able to take the high road on everybody. I think Obama is perfect for taking the high road. He’s prepared. He’s a black man. Him taking the high road is him taking the country on a high road. I think it’s gonna benefit everybody in America with that guy in office. Let’s hope it happens. Let’s hope it’s no funny business with that guy in office. Let’s hope for the best,” Nas continued.

For years, he was not interested in the political game but now Nas is giving Obama credit for bringing that interest back.

“It got me interested…I think in about 10 more years from today, you’re gonna have more politicians who grew up listening to Illmatic that are … MCs! That are rappers. You’re gonna start seeing more rappers evolve into politicians. If we have a change this year and it’s a positive thing, we trusting the system now. We believe in it more. We see something positive coming out of it that makes us want to get involved more. Five or 10 years from now, you might see somebody like me trust it more. Who knows? I won’t say for sure.”
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What Did She Really Mean?

You know, I didn’t really know what to make of Hillary Clinton’s latest ill-advised comments. It’s been a long race and it’s easy to slip up and say something innocent, but damaging if taken the wrong way, so I didn’t want to jump to conclusions. The below article is a very interesting take on the whole thing. Either she didn’t know the time lines of the democratic elections she was referencing or she took a serious shot at Obama (no pun intended)…

Clinton’s Grim Scenario
(The Washington Post) – If this campaign goes on much longer, what will be left of Hillary Clinton?

A woman uniformly described by her close friends as genuine, principled and sane has been reduced to citing the timing of Robert F. Kennedy’s assassination as a reason to stay in the race — an argument that is un-genuine, unprincipled and insane. She vows to keep pushing, perhaps all the way to the convention in August. What manner of disintegration is yet to come?

For anyone who missed it, Clinton was pleading her cause before the editorial board of the Sioux Falls, S.D., Argus Leader on Friday. Rejecting calls to drop out because her chances of winning have become so slight, she said the following: “My husband did not wrap up the nomination in 1992 until he won the California primary somewhere in the middle of June, right? We all remember Bobby Kennedy was assassinated in June in California. You know I just, I don’t understand it.”

The point isn’t whether you take Clinton at her word that she didn’t actually mean to suggest that someone — guess who? — might be assassinated. The point is: Whoa, where did that come from?

Setting aside for the moment the ugliness of Clinton’s remark, just try to make it hold together. Clinton’s basic argument is that attempts to push her out of the race are hasty and premature, since the nomination sometimes isn’t decided until June. She cites two election years, 1968 and 1992, as evidence — but neither is relevant to 2008 because the campaign calendar has been changed.

In 1968, the Democratic race kicked off with the New Hampshire primary on March 12; when Robert Kennedy was killed, the campaign was not quite three months old. In 1992, the first contest was the Iowa caucuses on Feb. 10; by the beginning of June, candidates had been battling for about 3 1/2 months — and it was clear that Bill Clinton would be the nominee, though he hadn’t technically wrapped it up.

This year, the Iowa caucuses were held on Jan. 3, the earliest date ever. Other states scrambled to move their contests up in the calendar as well. When June arrives, the candidates will have been slogging through primaries and caucuses for five full months — a good deal longer than in those earlier campaign cycles.

So Clinton’s disturbing remark wasn’t wishful thinking — as far as I know (to quote Clinton herself, when asked earlier this year about false rumors that her opponent Barack Obama is a Muslim). Clearly, it wasn’t logical thinking. It can only have been magical thinking, albeit not the happy-magic kind.

Clinton has always claimed to be the cold-eyed realist in the race, and at one point maybe she was. Increasingly, though, her words and actions reflect the kind of thinking that animates myths and fairy tales: Maybe a sudden and powerful storm will scatter my enemy’s ships. Maybe a strapping woodsman will come along and save the day. Continue reading

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Friday Question: Do we still have real elections in America…

…or is it just a glorified popularity content conducted by parties, corporations, and the popular media?  Do our votes really count or do corporations control the president and congress in the end anyway?  Is america’s government determined by the people?  Are politicians just a type of celebrity?

Weigh in

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