Tag Archives: nomination

Black vs. Mormon: Which one is more likely to get the RNC Nomination?

I’m being lazy and asking you guys some questions this week. :)

So, Herman Cain.  Really?  This guy is a joke right.  The Republicans are not really going to run this guy.  To me, he’s just as bad as Michelle B., the male and African-American version.  Are their strategists thinking that if you run 2 black people you’ll split the black vote or that color will not be a factor for minority voters and the issues will take center stage?  What is the strategy?  The fact that he’s getting so much air time for that 9-9-9 Sims economic plan is amazing.  Slow news cycle, maybe?  Come on, primary season.

I don’t see a Mormon getting the nod if the Evangelical Right has anything to say about it.  Um, I was raised Baptist and if Jehovah’s Witnesses aren’t thought to have the same religious beliefs, you know that Mormonism is going to be seen as a cult, basically.

So, a black guy and a white Mormon guy are at the top of the running.  Which one do you think has the best chance of getting the RNC nomination (if they both have any standing by next year)?  List some pros and cons if you have any or are conflicted with your choice.

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Possible plot to shoot Obama stopped

DENVER, Colorado (AFP) — Democratic White House hopeful Barack Obama faces “no credible threat” from what had appeared to be a plot on his life, CNN reported Tuesday, citing authorities who nevertheless are pressing on with their investigation.

The network reported that office of the United States Attorney said law enforcement officials are “absolutely confident there is no credible threat to the candidate.”

Four people were arrested Monday in Denver and charged with firearms and drug possession, amid fears of a plot to kill Obama.

Denver-based CBS34 said one of the men arrested had told authorities they were “going to shoot Obama from a high vantage point using … a rifle … sighted at 750 yards (meters).”

The shooting was supposed to happen on Thursday when Obama is scheduled to accept the nomination as the Democratic Party’s presidential candidate for the November elections at the 75,000-seat Invesco stadium, the television station reported.

The alleged plot was being investigated by the Secret Service, which is in charge of coordinating security for the Democratic Party convention as well as the FBI and the joint terrorism task force.

The US Attorney’s Office in Denver has scheduled a press conference on Tuesday to discuss the incident.

CBS34 also reported that one man was arrested on Sunday after police found two high-powered rifles in a rented pick-up truck he was driving, while another man in custody reportedly was wearing a swastika and was thought to have links to white supremacist groups. Continue reading

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Obama Nom Acceptance Speech: Will you be watching history?

Come rain or shine Barack Obama will address the Democratic convention at Mile High before a sea of 75,000 to accept the Democratic Presidential nomination in a spectacular finale to his party’s convention next month.

The address by Obama, who hopes to be America’s first black president, will be lent added poignancy by dint of its scheduling on the 45th anniversary of civil rights icon Martin Luther King’s “I have a dream” speech.

Will you be watching?  Do you consider this a pivotal, historical event?

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Is it a Different Country?

PAUL KRUGMAN of the NY Times says it just might be in his article today, “It’s a Different Country“.  Discussing Obama’s electability he talks about the current state of race and electoral politics. He says that  “decades of pressure on public figures and the media have helped drive both overt and strongly implied racism out of our national discourse”.

Fervent supporters of Barack Obama like to say that putting him in the White House would transform America. With all due respect to the candidate, that gets it backward. Mr. Obama is an impressive speaker who has run a brilliant campaign — but if he wins in November, it will be because our country has already been transformed.

Mr. Obama’s nomination wouldn’t have been possible 20 years ago. It’s possible today only because racial division, which has driven U.S. politics rightward for more than four decades, has lost much of its sting.

And the de-racialization of U.S. politics has implications that go far beyond the possibility that we’re about to elect an African-American president. Without racial division, the conservative message — which has long dominated the political scene — loses most of its effectiveness.

Take, for example, that old standby of conservatives: denouncing Big Government. Last week John McCain’s economic spokesman claimed that Barack Obama is President Bush’s true fiscal heir, because he’s “dedicated to the recent Bush tradition of spending money on everything.”

Now, the truth is that the Bush administration’s big-spending impulses have been largely limited to defense contractors. But more to the point, the McCain campaign is deluding itself if it thinks this issue will resonate with the public.

For Americans have never disliked Big Government in general. In fact, they love Social Security and Medicare, and strongly approve of Medicaid — which means that the three big programs that dominate domestic spending have overwhelming public support.

If Ronald Reagan and other politicians succeeded, for a time, in convincing voters that government spending was bad, it was by suggesting that bureaucrats were taking away workers’ hard-earned money and giving it to you-know-who: the “strapping young buck” using food stamps to buy T-bone steaks, the welfare queen driving her Cadillac. Take away the racial element, and Americans like government spending just fine.

But why has racial division become so much less important in American politics?

Part of the credit surely goes to Bill Clinton, who ended welfare as we knew it. I’m not saying that the end of Aid to Families With Dependent Children was an unalloyed good thing; it created a great deal of hardship. But the “bums on welfare” played a role in political discourse vastly disproportionate to the actual expense of A.F.D.C., and welfare reform took that issue off the table.

Another large factor has been the decline in urban violence…Click here for the rest of the article.

What do you think about this subject???

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Obama to Accept Nom on 45th Anniversary of King’s “I Have a Dream”

“Barack Obama will accept the Democratic nomination for President on August 28th — the 45th Anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s ‘I Have A Dream’ Speech. In many ways, Senator Obama’s nomination as president is a fulfillment of a dream — a dream long deferred — envisioning a country where people would ‘not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.'”Rev Jesse Jackson Jr. for Huffington Post

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Hello, Negro is Calling it for Barack Obama

We want to be in the good company of the “I told you so” crowd. So, we are chimming in to say that Barack Obama IS the Democratic Nominee. Oh, what an historic event!! Yes WE Can!

Obama wins Democratic nomination Reuters

It’s Obama Slate

Hillary to recognize Obama nomination MSNBC

Our favorite link today – Obama to Accept Nomination on 45th Anniversary of the “I Have a Dream Speech Huffington Post

Even Aljazeera is saying Obama ‘set to win nomination’.

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Clinton: Is this the end?

NPR is asking

A “drumbeat” has started to sound in the media the past week with the speech on race by Sen. Barack Obama and with the announcement of Bill Richardson’s endorsement of Obama – “this could be the beginning of the end for Clinton.”

Jim Vandehei and Mike Allen at Politico.com wrote today that “One big fact has largely been lost in the recent coverage of the Democratic presidential race: Hillary Rodham Clinton has virtually no chance of winning.”

Former Republican and Democratic strategist (in fact, he worked for the Clintons) Dick Morris said on Fox News yesterday that “First of all, he is the Democratic Party nominee. There is no way that Hillary Clinton is going to either beat him in elected delegates or persuade the superdelegates. He is the Democratic nominee.” (Morris did add that he thinks the Wright issue will sink Obama in the fall.)

Jack Cafferty, of the Cafferty File on CNN, used the phrase when talking about the Richardson endorsement and the delegate count. Specifically, Cafferty said Richardson’s status as a special delegate gives other special delegates the excuse to come out and support Obama now, despite the Wright controversy.

Toby Harnden, The Daily Telegraph’s U.S. editor since 2006, writes that Clinton has “no realistic path” to the nomination. “Unless Obama is, as the now-jailed former Louisiana governor Edwin Edwards once put it, ‘caught in bed with either a dead girl or a live boy’ she cannot overcome his pledged delegate lead.”

Slate’s Trailhead blog looks at the different ways that Clinton could catch up and pass Obama but then adds, “All this being a long way of saying, Hillary’s path to the nomination is not ‘narrow.’ It’s barricaded. Yet still there seems to be a hesitation among the media to declare Clinton dead. Maybe it’s her zombielike ability to rise again — first in New Hampshire, then in Nevada, then most recently in Texas and Ohio. But people have to understand there will be no knockout blow, no head shot. Rather it will be a long, slow exit that causes pain to everyone involved.”

But there are also two things to consider: 1) endorsements really haven’t mattered in the past. Kennedy endorsed Obama, and he still lost Mass. on Super Tuesday; 2) Clinton is way behind in pledged delegates but what about all of those superdelegates who may have benefited from the Clinton legacy in the past … and who will want to benefit from them in the future?

So what do you think? Is the end nigh? Does the Richardson announcement help Obama with superdelegates? What about Clinton’s ability to fight back again and again? (And hey, isn’t she leading in a lot of the polls right now?)

What do you think?  

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